Dryden Clark Week 6

Something that was interesting to me was reading about Friedrick Froebal and his idea around giving children gifts such as blocks, balls, and rods. This seemed to simple and not realistic to me that this would teach children concepts of size, volume, angles and balance. When I sat back and thought about it though you start to piece together how such a simple idea does work. Something else that stood out to me was how early school systems were set up in Canada as early as the 1850’s. This was shocking to me as I would have assumed that this would have been set up after the industrial revolution. Another thing I never would have thought of was how difficult it would have been for the government to set a public school system in Canada primarily the three big hurdles of funding, strong opposition to public schools and a shortage of teachers to teach. I would have thought early Canadians would support a public system so any child would have the opportunity for school.

I made connection with the Residential schools and the affects it had on the students. Working in a youth correctional centre I have seen youth brought up by parents and grandparents that attended these schools and the damage they did on them and unfortunately their children as well have been affected. Another connection I made in these readings are with the learning plan that was presented in the readings. The activity was that students research a First Nations tribe and present a speech to the class. I experienced a similar activity, but on different countries and as discussed it did peak my interest and got me more invested in the project than just reading from a text book. I would like to use similar activities in my own classroom.

My question is as a teacher should we adopt an individual teaching philosophy like realism or is it better to grab a combination of a few or even pick and choose pieces from each philosophy that you believe in and create you own individual philosophy?

3 thoughts on “Dryden Clark Week 6

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  1. Dyden, what a good question you have posed! In response, my opinion is that it is best to have a combination of different pieces of philosophy in order to create one of your own. As we have learned so far throughout our course, there are so many aspects to educating and it seems impossible to feel a certain way about just one single thing. It seems as though it is best to approach education with an open mind and a willingness to combine and mold different pieces of theory and practice together to get the best results. I guess we will have to wait and see for ourselves once we start teaching! 🙂

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    1. Dyden, what a good question you have posed! In response, my opinion is that it is best to have a combination of different pieces of philosophy in order to create one of your own. As we have learned so far throughout our course, there are so many aspects to educating and it seems impossible to feel a certain way about just one single thing. It seems as though it is best to approach education with an open mind and a willingness to combine and mold different pieces of theory and practice together to get the best results. I guess we will have to wait and see for ourselves once we start teaching! 🙂

      Like

  2. I was also fascinated about the Friedrick Froebal text. The idea of a small things that could have a big effect on children sounds drastic. When it comes down to it, it is actually true.

    This reading for me was a sad refresher of the residential schools. The aftermath of this schooling is still seen today. Just like you stated in your post! We should always remind ourselves about the residential schools.

    I personally relate to more than one “ism”. I also had the question of how we should use these “isms” in our future classrooms. I think that we should use more than one, or maybe like you said create our own philosophy.

    Dryden, your picture up top is beautiful! You wrote an awesome blog!

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